Universal Enrollment for Robla School District
Read more to learn what it means to have every kindergartener automatically enrolled in K2C.

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College savings are coming to Robla!
United Way California Capital Region is pleased to announce that every kindergartener in Robla School District will receive a $25 Seed Account this year! The Lead Kindergarten to College Coordinator CJ Crawley, Robla Superintendent Ruben Reyes, and the City of Sacramento all helped finalize a data agreement allowing universal enrollment in the Kindergarten to College Savings Program (K2C).

The K2C program has aimed to make higher education more accessible by starting college savings early and cultivating an expectation among local youth that higher education is in their future. In addition to the initial seed, every Robla kindergarten student can end the year with $175 of savings in a ScholarShare 529 account held in their name. We expect these Seed Accounts to have persistent impacts on Robla students as the funds grow. In fact, research on programs similar to K2C shows that students with any college savings in their name, like the K2C Seed Accounts, are 3x more likely to enroll in and 4x more likely to complete college.  

The benefits of Robla’s K2C enrollment do not end there. Research on the effects of universal enrollment savings programs like K2C in Robla indicate that this is the best model for achieving equity in college savings. Overall savings and rates of savings increase significantly among low and middle income households in universal programs when compared to individual “opt-in” programs. This leads to a more equitable distribution of savings for college and ensures inclusion in the program outside of households who already save. These positive effects only increase over time.  

In all, Robla’s universal Seed Accounts for kindergarteners could have major potential impacts for each individual student and Robla as a whole. We hope that this leads to a generation of youth with high expectations, commitment to continued learning, and access to higher education. Clearly, the graduating class of 2032 has a very bright future.

Sources

Assets and Education Initiative. (2013). Building Expectations, Delivering Results: Asset-Based Financial Aid and the Future of Higher Education. In W. Elliott (Ed.), Biannual report on the assets and education field. Lawrence, KS: Assets and Education Initiative (AEDI). 24.
 

Elliott, W. (2018). Lessons learned from Children’s Savings Account programs: Tools to leverage spending to facilitate saving among low income families. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan, Center on Assets, Education & Inclusion. 11-13.